Alfred A. Knopf, Jr.

Alfred A. Knopf, Jr., died Saturday, at age 90, of complications from a fall, according to the Associated Press. Son of the iconic publishers who founded Alfred A. Knopf Inc., he had his own vision, and carried it to a new publishing company, Atheneum Publishers, that he co-founded. He published a number of classic works, including Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”

 

In this time when major publishers are cutting entire divisions, and bloody Wednesday is still sending shock waves through the industry, it is perhaps a little bizarre to lose such a figurehead of the publishing world. Does this foretell of further darkness to come? I leave each of you to interpret the harbinger as you will.

 

Godspeed to Mr. Knopf, and heartfelt sympathy to his family.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/16/books/16knopf.html

Strange Questions

I find myself asking strange questions when I write. How long did it take a steam ship to cross the Atlantic in the 1920s? How long did early flashlight batteries last? When did they invent Christmas tree lights?

 

One characteristic of most writers I know is their insatiable curiosity. (Do laser beams ricochet?) I think that’s one of the greatest draws for me—constantly learning something new. I am currently learning how to pick locks, play Chinese checkers, and do some basic martial arts. When you’re writing a historical novel, like my middle grade adventure The Egyptian Enigma (set in 1922 Philadelphia), the learning curve is steep. (Did Philadelphia have any traffic signals then? Did police use photographs in their crime scene investigations?) But it’s a heck of a lot of fun.

 

I’ll admit, I was the kid in college who loved to hear that we had a research paper as part of a class. Digging into information, finding the facts I needed, putting together pieces of the puzzle—it was great fun for me. My husband will tell you, I can’t walk away from an unfinished puzzle. It’s an addiction.

 

I’ve always said I would love to be a perpetual student, and I find that, as a writer, I actually am. There’s always another question to answer, another avenue to explore, another fact to track down, all in the name of world-building.

 

Now, when did they “invent” chunky peanut butter?

I am a writer

I am a writer.

 

That is a powerful statement. The brevity of the words “I am” belies their definitive power. “I am” cuts to the essence of who and what you are as a person. A strong statement, “I am.”

 

I am a writer.

 

The force of that statement first hit home when Jonathan Maberry spoke about it in one of his workshops. We students had all shared what we “were.” Most of their statements were similar to mine: “I’m a video editor who has always loved to write, and wish I could write for a living.” After we were done, Jonathan told us that if we were serious about writing for a living, the first thing we had to do was define ourselves as writers. We had to start thinking of ourselves and introducing ourselves to others saying, “I am a writer.” He claimed that thinking this way would place writing as a high priority in our lives, that we (and others) would begin to take our writing seriously, and that it was only then that we could become successful as writers.

 

Jonathan was right. I began thinking of myself as a writer first. Very soon, I was no longer a video editor who writes, but a writer whose day job was video editing. Then (due to my wonderful, supportive husband!), I got the opportunity to quit the day job and pursue writing full-time. I make some money editing (words, not video), but the majority of my time is spent pursuing my craft and my dream. For the first time in my life, I wake up every day eager to get to work!

 

I am a writer!

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